King of England, Henry VIII Tudor

Male 1491 - 1547  (55 years)


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  • Name King of England, Henry VIII Tudor 
    Born 28 Jun 1491  Greenwich Palace, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Death 28 Jan 1546/7  Whitehall, London, Middlesex, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Died 28 Jan 1546/7  Whitehall, London, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID I26550  32 Generations
    Last Modified 14 Jul 2008 

    Father King Of England, Henry VII Tudor,   b. 28 Jan 1456/7, Pembroke Castle, Pembrokeshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 21 Apr 1509  (Age 52 years) 
    Mother Plantagenet, Elizabeth of York,   b. 11 Feb 1465/6, Westminster Palace, London, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 11 Feb 1502/3, Tower of London, London, England Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 37 years) 
    Married 18 Jan 1485/6  Westminster, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Notes 
    • As great grandson of John Beaufort, the son of John of Gaunt of Lancaster, Henry (VII) Tudor was able to win the throne in 1485 partly by virtue of his descent, from the Lancastrian Plantagenets. (it also helped enormously that he married a Yorkist Plantagenet Princess).
    Family ID F37657  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 1 Boleyn, Anne,   b. Abt 1501, Blickling Hall, Norfolk, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 19 May 1536, Tower Green, Tower of London, Engand - Beheaded Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 35 years) 
    Family ID F9748  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 2 Boleyn, Mary,   b. Abt 1499,   d. 19 Jul 1543  (Age ~ 44 years) 
    Married 1522 
    Children 
     1. Tudor, Henry (Carey) Baron Hundson,   b. 1526,   d. 1596  (Age 70 years)
     2. Tudor, Mary (Katherine) (Carey),   b. 1524,   d. 15 Jun 1569, Hampton Court Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 45 years)
    Family ID F37658  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 3 Aragón, Catherine Of,   b. 15 Dec 1485,   d. Deceased 
    Family ID F16409  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 4 Clèves, Anne Of,   b. 1515,   d. 1557  (Age 42 years) 
    Family ID F16410  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Notes 


    • REF: The British Monarchy Official Website: Henry VIII was born at Greenwich on 28 June 1491, the second son of Henry VII and Elizabeth of York. He became heir to the throne on the death of his elder brother, Prince Arthur, in 1502 and succeeded in 1509. He was athletic, and highly intelligent with scholarly interests; he wrote both books and music and was a lavish patron of the arts. (Greensleeves, the popular melody frequently attributed to him is, however, almost certainly not one of his compositions.) As the author of a best selling book (it went through some 20 editions in England and Europe) attacking Martin Luther and supporting the Roman Catholic church, in 1521 Henry was given the title 'Defender of the Faith' by the Pope. From his father, Henry VIII inherited a stable realm with the monarch's finances in healthy surplus. His varied interests and lack of application to government business and administration increased the influence of Thomas Wolsey, his Lord Chancellor from 1515 to 1529. Henry's interest in foreign policy was focused on Western Europe which was a shifting pattern of alliances centred round the kings of Spain and France, and the Holy Roman Emperor. An example of these shifts was Henry's unsuccessful Anglo-Spanish campaigns against France, ending in peace with France in 1520, when he spent huge sums on displays and tournaments at the Field of the Cloth of Gold. The second half of Henry's reign was very different. It was dominated by two issues very important for the later history of England: the succession and the Protestant Reformation. Henry had married his brother's widow, Catherine of Aragon, in 1509. Catherine had produced only one surviving child - agirl, Princess Mary, born in 1516. The Tudor dynasty had been established by conquest in 1485 and Henry was only its second monarch. England had not so far had a ruling queen, and the dynasty was not secure enough to run the risk of handing the crown on to a woman, risking disputed succession or domination of a foreign power through marriage. By the end of the 1520s Henry was desperate for a son. He had anyway fallen in love with Anne Boleyn the sister of one of his many mistresses, and tried to persuade the Pope to grant him an annulment of his marriage on the grounds that it had never been legal. However, a previous Pope had specifically granted Henry a licence to marry his brother's widow in 1509. All the efforts of Henry and his advisers came to nothing. Increasingly desperate, Henry decided to break with the Roman Catholic Church by declaring himself, rather than the Pope, the Supreme Head of the Church in England. He also said that England was an 'empire': not subject to anyone else's laws. A series of Acts, including an Act of Submission of the Clergy, passed through Parliament in the early 1530s brought about an English Reformation and the Dissolution of the Monasteries, under which monastic lands and possessions were broken up and sold off. Crown revenues doubled for a few years, but most of the money was spent on the war with France. In bringing about the Reformation Henry was helped by two great public servants,Thomas Cromwell and Thomas Cranmer, his Archbishop of Canterbury from 1532. Henry had freed himself to re-marry. Anne Boleyn however, produced another daughter, Princess Elizabeth, and failed to produce a male heir. Henry got rid of Anne on charges of treason which were almost certainly false, and she was executed in 1536. Her replacement, Henry's third wife, Jane Seymour, finally bore him a son in 1537, later to become Edward VI. Jane, however, died in childbed 12 days after the birth. Henry made three more marriages, to Anne of Cleves (whom he divorced months after marriage), Katharine Howard (executed on grounds of adultery in 1542) and Catherine Parr (who survived Henry to die in 1548). None produced any children. Henry made sure that Edward was educated by people who believed in Protestantism rather than Catholicism because he wanted the anti-papal nature of his reformation and his dynasty to become more firmly established. He died in London on 28 January 1547. To some, Henry VIII was a strong and ruthless ruler, forcing through changes to the Church/State relationship which excluded the papacy and brought the clergy under control, thus strengthening the Crown's position and acquiring the monasteries' wealth. However, his reformation had produced dangerous Protestant/Roman Catholic differences in the kingdom, the monasteries' wealth had been spent on wars and had also built up the economic strength of the aristocracy, and Parliament's involvement in making religious and dynastic changes had been firmly established. His six marriages had produced one sickly son and an insecure succession with two princesses (Mary and Elizabeth) who at one stage had been declared illegitimate. These problems were made worse by ambitious Tudor court factions.

      From same: Henry VIII (reigned 1509-47) was 17 when he became king. His first wife, Catherine of Aragon, provided him with a daughter, Mary, but no male
      heir. In order to divorce her, he broke with the Roman Catholic Church and declared himself Supreme Head of the Church of England. Five subsequent marriages produced two children, Elizabeth and Edward. The break with Rome led to the Dissolution of the Monasteries (in which monastic lands and buildings were sold or disposed of, and the monks disbanded or imprisoned) and the beginnings of the English Reformation. Henry's involvement in European politics brought him into conflict with the Scots who were defeated at Solway Moss in 1542 (the Scots had been defeated before at the battle of Flodden in 1516). Control of Wales was strengthened by the Acts of Union of 1536 and 1542 which united England and Wales administratively and legally, and gave Wales representation in Parliament. Henry died in 1547 leaving his sickly, 10-year-old son to inherit the throne as Edward VI (reigned 1547-53).

      REF: gen-medieval newsgroup: It was unheard of before Henry VIII for a King to have two wives living, and to cast aside the aunt of no less a personage than Charles V , the Holy Roman Emperor.


      Original individual @I34382@ (@MS_BIGGED.GED0@) merged with @I12493@ (@MS_BIGGED.GED0@)

      REF: The British Monarchy Official Website: Henry VIII was born at Greenwich on 28 June 1491, the second son of Henry VII and Elizabeth of York. He became heir to the throne on the death of his elder brother, Prince Arthur, in 1502 and succeeded in 1509. He was athletic, and highly intelligent with scholarly interests; he wrote both books and music and was a lavish patron of the arts. (Greensleeves, the popular melody frequently attributed to him is, however, almost certainly not one of his compositions.) As the author of a best selling book (it went through some 20 editions in England and Europe) attacking Martin Luther and supporting the Roman Catholic church, in 1521 Henry was given the title 'Defender of the Faith' by the Pope. From his father, Henry VIII inherited a stable realm with the monarch's finances in healthy surplus. His varied interests and lack of application to government business and administration increased the influence of Thomas Wolsey, his Lord Chancellor from 1515 to 1529. Henry's interest in foreign policy was focused on Western Europe which was a shifting pattern of alliances centred round the kings of Spain and France, and the Holy Roman Emperor. An example of these shifts was Henry's unsuccessful Anglo-Spanish campaigns against France, ending in peace with France in 1520, when he spent huge sums on displays and tournaments at the Field of the Cloth of Gold. The second half of Henry's reign was very different. It was dominated by two issues very important for the later history of England: the succession and the Protestant Reformation. Henry had married his brother's widow, Catherine of Aragon, in 1509. Catherine had produced only one surviving child - agirl, Princess Mary, born in 1516. The Tudor dynasty had been established by conquest in 1485 and Henry was only its second monarch. England had not so far had a ruling queen, and the dynasty was not secure enough to run the risk of handing the crown on to a woman, risking disputed succession or domination of a foreign power through marriage. By the end of the 1520s Henry was desperate for a son. He had anyway fallen in love with Anne Boleyn the sister of one of his many mistresses, and tried to persuade the Pope to grant him an annulment of his marriage on the grounds that it had never been legal. However, a previous Pope had specifically granted Henry a licence to marry his brother's widow in 1509. All the efforts of Henry and his advisers came to nothing. Increasingly desperate, Henry decided to break with the Roman Catholic Church by declaring himself, rather than the Pope, the Supreme Head of the Church in England. He also said that England was an 'empire': not subject to anyone else's laws. A series of Acts, including an Act of Submission of the Clergy, passed through Parliament in the early 1530s brought about an English Reformation and the Dissolution of the Monasteries, under which monastic lands and possessions were broken up and sold off. Crown revenues doubled for a few years, but most of the money was spent on the war with France. In bringing about the Reformation Henry was helped by two great public servants,Thomas Cromwell and Thomas Cranmer, his Archbishop of Canterbury from 1532. Henry had freed himself to re-marry. Anne Boleyn however, produced another daughter, Princess Elizabeth, and failed to produce a male heir. Henry got rid of Anne on charges of treason which were almost certainly false, and she was executed in 1536. Her replacement, Henry's third wife, Jane Seymour, finally bore him a son in 1537, later to become Edward VI. Jane, however, died in childbed 12 days after the birth. Henry made three more marriages, to Anne of Cleves (whom he divorced months after marriage), Katharine Howard (executed on grounds of adultery in 1542) and Catherine Parr (who survived Henry to die in 1548). None produced any children. Henry made sure that Edward was educated by people who believed in Protestantism rather than Catholicism because he wanted the anti-papal nature of his reformation and his dynasty to become more firmly established. He died in London on 28 January 1547. To some, Henry VIII was a strong and ruthless ruler, forcing through changes to the Church/State relationship which excluded the papacy and brought the clergy under control, thus strengthening the Crown's position and acquiring the monasteries' wealth. However, his reformation had produced dangerous Protestant/Roman Catholic differences in the kingdom, the monasteries' wealth had been spent on wars and had also built up the economic strength of the aristocracy, and Parliament's involvement in making religious and dynastic changes had been firmly established. His six marriages had produced one sickly son and an insecure succession with two princesses (Mary and Elizabeth) who at one stage had been declared illegitimate. These problems were made worse by ambitious Tudor court factions.

      From same: Henry VIII (reigned 1509-47) was 17 when he became king. His first wife, Catherine of Aragon, provided him with a daughter, Mary, but no male
      heir. In order to divorce her, he broke with the Roman Catholic Church and declared himself Supreme Head of the Church of England. Five subsequent marriages produced two children, Elizabeth and Edward. The break with Rome led to the Dissolution of the Monasteries (in which monastic lands and buildings were sold or disposed of, and the monks disbanded or imprisoned) and the beginnings of the English Reformation. Henry's involvement in European politics brought him into conflict with the Scots who were defeated at Solway Moss in 1542 (the Scots had been defeated before at the battle of Flodden in 1516). Control of Wales was strengthened by the Acts of Union of 1536 and 1542 which united England and Wales administratively and legally, and gave Wales representation in Parliament. Henry died in 1547 leaving his sickly, 10-year-old son to inherit the throne as Edward VI (reigned 1547-53).

      REF: gen-medieval newsgroup: It was unheard of before Henry VIII for a King to have two wives living, and to cast aside the aunt of no less a personage than Charles V , the Holy Roman Emperor.